Graphing Piecewise Functions – Casio Prizm vs. TI-84+ CE

2016-02-04_16-50-11In my explorations of hand-held calculators and how they can support mathematics learning, I want to continually share when I learn new things. Why calculators? Well, the obvious answer is because I am working with Casio. But the real answer is, if you actually go around the country and go into math classrooms, calculators are still the most-used and available technology to students.  I know, I know -we hear about iPads, tablets, laptops, etc. in use in classrooms, but the reality is these are NOT readily available to most students.  I think I did a post already about this (Calculators, A thing of the past?), but from my own personal experiences, teaching and working with teachers (some of these in the last couple of months), most math classrooms are still working with the following technology: one computer with projector/screen (sometimes a whiteboard, most often NOT), and then hand-held calculators.  And, unfortunately, not even enough of those for each student.

So – yes, despite the ‘edtech revolution’ we hear about in the news, in the real, every-day classroom, students are most often using calculators, and this will be the case for quite a while unless there is some funding-miracle, which, as we know, is very unlikely.  It’s a sad reality – as an edtech supporter, I would love more than anything all 2016-02-04_16-22-37students to have access to technology on a regular basis that allows them to quickly research, explore, practice and visualize mathematics, whether that be via tablets or computers or calculators. But as most of us who work in/with schools know, that is NOT what’s actually happening in most math classrooms.  That said, let’s focus on the great technology that is accessible to a majority of students – and if not, should be, since it’s affordable, portable and can do much of the visualization and exploration that students should be doing in mathematics – graphing calculators.

Now another reality is that TI seems to be the go-to calculator found more often in schools, a lot of this due to brainwashing and really good marketing and the old “change is hard” mentality in education. I myself was a TI graphing calculator user the whole time I was teaching in public schools because that’s what we had. What I am now finding more and more, as I learn the Casio and compare it to the TI, is that I can remember what to do on the Casio way more so than I can on the TI.  That’s just one thing, though admittedly a pretty major thing.  And – while many of the steps for using the TI and Casio are often similar, the Casio is often quicker and more efficient than the TI, and can usually provide a visualization on one screen that helps make a connection which might otherwise be impossible to see when having to look at separate graphs (i.e. graphing  y= and r= on one graph).

My goal here is to point out places where Casio has an advantage over TI (and I am comparing the Casio Prizm and TI-84 CE, which are the graphing calculators most similar and also both are accepted on standardized tests). Obviously, my opinion is probably considered biased – though I am speaking as someone with over 26 years experience, one who has used many different technologies and only ever taught with the TI (Navigator included). I honestly find the Casio more fun and easier.  More intuitive. I just can’t remember where things are with the TI – it’s frustrating! As they say with many things – once you go Casio, you’ll never go back! But – I don’t think I would feel this way if I wasn’t constantly comparing the two side by side, something most teachers never get the chance to do.  With that said, here is another side-to-side comparison of the Casio Prizm and the TI-84 CE showing how to graph a piecewise function, something I believe Algebra II teachers are probably getting into about now, that helps illustrate my preference for the Casio over the TI.

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