Spring Is In The Air – The Sweet Smell of Testing….

Don’t you just love spring? The flowers blooming, trees bursting with new leaves, bees buzzing around, IMG_2650and the weather turning warmer.  Walking around town this morning looking at all the beautiful trees and flowers certainly reminded me how much I love the spring.  Then, as I walked past the local high school, I was reminded of what spring means to most students, (students who were probably staring out at the beautiful weather right that moment.).  Testing.  Spring doesn’t smell so sweet to them, I imagine.

I remember when I was teaching back in Virginia, where we test-prep-posterhad the Standards of Learning End-of-Course tests every April/May (the S.O.L.’s….appropriate acronym!)  (They still have these of course).  What I remember is how the whole month of April leading up to the tests was focused on test prep — review, review, practice test, practice test, pep rally to pump kids up, more review, etc.  By the time the actual tests rolled around, students were so tired of “practicing” that they probably didn’t even care about the tests. Then, those that had to take the AP tests as well still had those to look forward to.  As a teacher, I HATED this time of the year as much as the kids because it felt like learning was forced to stop so kids could “get ready for the test’.  I would much rather have kept on with teaching new and exciting things – applying the math by making bridges out of toothpicks or tetrahedron kites, using technology, etc.  I knew my students were ready because they’d been learning and applying all along – they didn’t need all this down-time for test prep. But ‘preparing for the test’ was a district/school/department mandate. I had no choice. The computer labs were taken over for testing, so no more Sketchpad. The days on the calendar had required test prep mandates and there were weekly department meetings to look at the practice test data and pick the review  materials for continued preparation.  The whole school was focused on getting kids excited about taking a test.  Students hated it.  Teachers hated it.  And we all forgot that it was spring. We were all too stressed about passing the test so that the school met AYP (Adequate Yearly Progress from No Child Left Behind) and we stressed about getting at least 70% of our students to pass the test and students to get at least 70% ON the tests, so we would get good evaluations (teachers) or graduate (students).  Spring was a time of anxiety, not beauty.

Hopefully, if not this year, by next year, all this will change. With the passage of the Every Student imagesSucceeds Act (ESSA) there may be a spring again. Yes, there will still be testing.  Assessment is important obviously, to determine where changes need to be made in instruction, to ensure students are learning and meeting standards, to ensure that teachers and schools are educating students.  But testing is going to change and it won’t be this punitive system (I hope) that NCLB created.  And hopefully, it won’t be a constant thing where months of a school year are taken up with test prep and test taking. That’s a good thing. School should be about learning, not just testing, which is what it often feels like, especially this time of year.

ESSA obviously is new and it will take time for changes to be implemented.  Though even as early as this year, there are states who have changed their testing or eliminated testing this year.  The ESSA (from 5 ways ESSA Impacts Standardized Testing, by Anne O’Brien):

  • Allows districts to use a locally determined, nationally recognized test like the ACT or SAT instead of the state test in high schools, which could have huge implications for classroom practice
  • Allows states to institute a cap limiting the amount of time that students spend taking tests, which could reduce that time (and the time educators spend administering them)
  • Funds states in auditing and streamlining assessment systems, eliminating unnecessary and duplicative assessments
  • Establishes a pilot program in up to seven states (or consortia of states) that allows for the complete revamping of their assessment system, meaning that it’s possible that summative state tests as we know them will be eliminated, replaced by competency-based assessments, performance-based assessments, interim assessments, or something else entirely
  • Allows for the use of computer-adaptive testing in state and local assessments (NCLB did not), a process that could allow for much more accurate data on student performance

IMG_2649I think one of my most favorite things about ESSA is that it requires states to use more than academic factors (i.e. standardized test scores) as indicators of accountability and school/student success. A test score is no longer the be-all and end-all, allowing education to focus on learning, not test prep and testing.

Maybe now both teachers and students can start enjoying spring again.

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