Conics – Casio Prizm vs. TI-84+CE

I am currently teaching a course at Drexel University and we are starting a unit on circles. I loved using Sketchpad when teaching because it allowed for dynamic manipulation of objects (shapes, functions) so that students could visually see the impact of variables to the shape, size, position of the object. Unfortunately, my students (math teachers in a Masters Math Teaching Program) do not have access to Sketchpad, though one does use Geogebra, and as this is a course focused on teaching, they need to use what they have access to in their own classrooms with their students. For many of them this does not involve any technology at all, which is sad, but for some, they do have access to graphing calculators.

Naturally, this got me exploring what the graphing calculators could do, and surprise, surprise, I noticed quite a difference between the Casio Prizm and the TI-84+CE graphing calculators, which are the ones my class seems to have. I was investigating conics, and in particular circles, and what options the graphing calculators gave me, especially when thinking about dynamically modifying the variables to see how each impacts the graph of the circle. Here’s is a quick summary of what I found:

  1. Both TI-84 & Casio Prizm can graph conics (circles, ellipses, hyperbola, and parabola, though how to access these conic graphs is different on both.
    • It is more apparent/easy to find on the Casio (there is a Conic Graph menu).
    • TI requires knowing that there is a Conic app in the app menu, which is a button on the calculator. It is not seen from the main screen, and if you don’t know it exists, you won’t know it’s available.
  2. Both provide more than one equation form for each conic.
  3. Both show the graph of the conic, but how is very different.
    • Casio shows the graph on the coordinate grid, where you can see the whole grid, see values on each axis, and identify quadrant and key points on the graph
    • TI shows the graph in the entire window with a weird yellow frame around it. It is difficult to determine where on the coordinate grid the graph appears – there are axis marks, but no values, not origin, making it difficult for students to understand where on the coordinate grid the graph is. Very difficult to identify quadrant and key points on the graph.
  4. Both allow you to enter different values for each coefficient variable,
    • Casio has a modify feature that allows you to see the equation, graph, and coefficient variables on one screen. You can then modify one coefficient at a time and see it dynamically change on the graph, allowing students to visually see how each impacts the graph and see the conic change shape, location, and/or size.
    • TI84+CE only shows the graph or the equation/coefficients – never together.  You have to go back and forth between them when changing values. The TI does not clearly show where on the grid the graph is, does not show a size change (all conics look the same size, but the grid scale is changing). It’s actually very confusing and would be difficult to help student visually see the impact of changing coefficient variables on the size, location and shape.

Below is a video I made showing how to graph a circle and modify the coefficients on both calculators so you can see the differences I am talking about.

Hopefully you will come to the same conclusion I did – Casio Prizm is far superior when graphing conics than the TI84+CE.

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