Global Warming? Let’s Look at Some Data

I realize that I am most likely among the minority of folks when I say I miss snow. I have lived in the Philadelphia area going on 3 1/2 years now, and this ‘winter’ has to be one of the most disappointing ones so far.  I think we’ve seen maybe 3 days of snow – less than 3 inches, and all gone in a couple hours.  I haven’t even had to shovel or scrape the car but one time…. There has been a lot of rain. It’s raining today, and suppose to get to 60. Yep – sounds like spring to me, NOT winter! Where’s my snow? Where’s the sledding?

I grew up in Virginia and spent most of my life in Virginia, where we got a lot of snow – I remember some pretty amazing snow storms and tobogganing down the driveway with my brothers and sister. I then moved to Houston, TX for five years back in 2008 and basically lost any hope of seeing snow or even seasons. There is no real winter….no real spring…definitely no change of seasons in Houston, though it is definitely as hot as people say. When we moved back east to the Philly area 3 1/2 years ago, I was so excited to experience a fall again, and my first winter here we had so much snow, we were actually tunneling our way out.  It was great! Sledding at the castle, power outages forcing us to hunker down at the local bars – snowstorms were fun – even the shoveling brought out the neighborhood and a lot of goodwill!

 

The lack of snow this year, and the weird warm temperatures this winter, where it has felt more like spring than winter, has me thinking about whether this is a normal pattern for the area or is it ‘global warming'(which according to our illustrious leader is a hoax), or is it something else? I think it would be an interesting and relevant real-world investigation for students to look at and analyze and make some conclusions and even some predictions, no matter where they live. My guess is lots of you are experiencing some weird weather patterns this ‘winter’ – i.e. Utah & California for example.  I know the kids around here are disappointed there have been no snow days, so they’d probably love the chance to study the numbers and see if this is an expected pattern and hopefully find a chance of snow still exists.

No matter where you live, weather patterns are a great way to analyze data and apply mathematical concepts. Most countries, states, cities and town keep a historical record of weather data – by year, by month, by day.  There are lots of different measures taken into account – temperature (lows & highs), precipitation (rain and snow), barometer pressure, wind, etc. This data is relatively easy to find as well just by doing a simple internet search. Many sites provide customization, where you can specify month, year and other data that you are interested in looking at. I did a relatively simple search for Philadelphia historical data, and compared the month of January from 2013 to 2017 – here are the numbers:

Granted, a little hard to see, but just in a quick glance, students might note that this past January 2017 we had about 5.59 inches of snow fall compared to 19.41 inches in 2016 (all in one day?!!), 3.9 in 2015, 25.86 in 2014, and 3.75 in 2013. Based on this, maybe it’s every other year that we get a lot of snow? Maybe this has nothing to do with global warming? Is there enough data to make these conclusions? Should we be looking at more months or more years? What about the average high or the average lows for each month? Does that make a difference? There are so many interesting questions and comparisons that students could explore with weather data. As a teacher, you could be applying a lot of things like ratio, proportion, measures of central tendency, different types graphical displays, fractions, decimals, algebra.  It’s a font of real-world data that could be used in so many different ways and in so many different math courses. And students would be interested, especially if you are using data from where they live.  Maybe compare the data to other similar cities or other very dissimilar cities. Do a cross-curriculum investigation – i.e. science, language arts, history.

Depending where you live, you can use weather to help students relate mathematics to their own world and explore their environment while doing math. In CA, as an example, you’ve received a tremendous amount of rain this winter – is it enough to end the drought? How long would that take and how much rain? Interesting and relevant questions students would love to investigate. In Utah, how has all the snow impacted the skiing and tourist dollars coming into the state? In Louisiana, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida – how common are tornadoes in ‘winter’?

Lot’s of questions. Lot’s of data out there ready to explore.

One last question – will there be a big snow storm in the Philly area in the next few weeks? I hope the answer is yes…I need a snow day!

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