Complex Numbers – Support for Calculations

I received a question on one of my Youtube video posts on the Casio Fx991 scientific calculator asking if it was possible to do complex number calculations on this calculator. The answer is of course yes – which then prompted me to make a quick video today on exactly how to do that with the fx991. See the video below:

This of course then made me think of our other technologies and that perhaps I should show how to do complex numbers with these tools as well.

Here’s the steps on the graphing calculators (any of the Casio models, since they all basically work similarly – the beauty of Casio, the buttons are relatively consistent). This example uses the CG50, but see fx-9750, fx-9860, etc).

And finally, on ClassPad.net, the FREE online math software that does it all – statistics, geometry, graphing, and of course calculations. (You can sign up for a free account (ALWAYS free) – here’s a quick how-to).

The question of course arises, when are we even using complex numbers? Or why do we need them? As I never really taught math content that required students to utilize complex numbers, I don’t feel I am able to answer these questions with authority, so I did a bit of research. For one, if we just go from a ‘content/standards’ perspective, if you are in states that incorporate The Common Core Math Standards (or a version of, whether renamed or not), then it is actually part of the High School: Number and Quantity standards which state, “Students will…”:

  • Perform arithmetic operations with complex numbers
  • Represent complex numbers and their operations on the complex plane
  • Use complex numbers in polynomial identities and equations

But, that of course doesn’t really get at why do we need them. So here are some things I found in my search for this answer. I admit I can’t explain these any more than just listing them, but it at least points to places where complex numbers are in fact important and needed.

  • Complex numbers are used in electronics to describe the circuit elements (voltage across the current) with a single complex number z=V+iI
  • Electromagnetic fields are best described by a single complex number
  • People who use complex numbers in their daily work are electrical engineers, electronic circuit designers, and anyone who needs to solve differential equations.

Hopefully this is helpful to those of you who are in fact doing complex calculations for whatever reason!

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