Mini-Math Lessons – Simple Statistical Plots and Explorations (ES/MS)

Yesterday I posted a rather sophisticated exploration of data from Ish Zamora on CoVid19, where using a logistics model and exponential growth, you could collect data and make predictions. This got me in a statistical mood, so I thought I would focus this week on statistics. We did a brief exploration of measures of center in a previous mini-lesson post, so this week will just expand on this, starting from a more basic look at different statistical plots, and then moving into some more statistical analysis by the end of the week, with regressions, and normal distributions, etc. In large part because Casio is offering the for-fee apps of CAS and AP Statistics free for the rest of the school year, so I want to make sure everyone is aware of the statistical options that are available on ClassPad.net.  Check out other supports Casio is offering here, at Casio Cares (free hand-held emulator software, free ready-to-use ES-Calculus math lessons, etc.)

Today the focus is more at an elementary/middle school level, where we will explore measures of center and look at different plots and help students learn to make decisions about representations and descriptions. A continuation of what we did in the previous post. There are lots of opportunities in these activities for students to collect their own data (so be creative), though they can use the preset data if they want.

  1. ES – Statistical Measures and Graphs – What’s the Best Representation
  2. ES – Measures of Center w/Presidential Data 
  3. ES – Dot Plots & Histograms
  4. ES – Box Plots & Histograms

The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below:

 

Mini-Math Lessons – Corona Explorations – Exponential & Logistics

There are a lot of statistics out there and a lot of graphs, some accurate and some not, on the CoVid19 virus. Which can be confusing and scary. Today’s mini-lesson is just one activity and video from Ish Zamora (@seemathrun) that tries to provide you with an understanding of how the data impacts predictions. Using a logistical curve, you will see how changes in the numbers impact the steepness of the curve and the predicted end date. You will collect your own data and answer questions about the impact of those data points.

Be sure to watch the accompanying video first to get a sense of how to collect the data and observe the changes in the curve.

The links are below.

  1. Corona Logistic Video Overview
  2. Corona Logistics Activity

We will be back tomorrow with some more mini-math lessons focused on simple statistical plots and what they can tell us about data from the elementary perspective.

Remember – stay inside, wash your hands, and social distance and we can beat this thing!!


The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below:

 

 

Mini-Math Lessons – Transformation Practice

This week I’ve spent most of the time on transformations, so if students have explored the progression of lessons, they would hopefully by now have an understanding of what translations, rotations, reflections and dilations are, including properties. This means they understand the difference between rigid and non-rigid transformations, know the different properties about orientation, corresponding sides and angles, just to mention a few.  Today’s two activities are basically practicing those properties in different ways. The first activity, Transformations – Where Am I Now? focuses on applying the properties of transformation (both rigid and non-rigid) in a coordinate grid and determining coordinates of transformed images, based on a specific transformation and directives. The second activity, Transformations – How Did I Get Here?, is using the properties of transformation to determine WHAT combination of transformations were done to map a preimage onto a given image, and also things like finding the line of reflection or the point of dilation, all of which require an understanding of the properties of transformations.

Here is the link to the two activities and the one video that gives an overview of both.

  1. Transformations – Where Am I Now?
  2. Transformations – How Did I Get Here?

The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below:

 

Mini-Math Lessons – Dilations & Scale

Today I am going to focus on dilations, a type of transformation that is non-rigid, meaning it changes the size of an object (unlike a rigid transformation, that keeps size and shape the the same).  Dilations do keep the shape of a dilated object the same, but the dilated image is either smaller by a given scale, larger by a given scale. Technically, if the scale is one, then the dilated image is still a rigid transformation, but then, is it really a transformation because it would NOT have changed anything about the shape – it is exactly the same….might be a fun discussion to have with students!

I have only created two activities for today.  The first one is all about exploring dilations and properties of dilation. It starts off just exploring what a dilation is via sliders and moving the dilated image and changing the scale so that there is some sense of what happens in a dilation. The next portion of the activity we really focus on dilation and the proportional relationships between corresponding sides and their relation to the scale. And then we extend into perspective and finding the point of dilation.  The second activity is more of an application of dilation – i.e. scaling objects (so scale models of rooms as an example), and maps and a little bit more on using dilations for perspective drawings/constructs.

Here are the links to the activities and the video overviews that explain and walk through each activity a bit.

  1. Dilation Explorations1 coordinates – Non-rigid Transformations
  2. Dilation Explorations2 – Scale and Perspective

 


The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below:

Mini-Math Lessons – Multiple Topics (Calculus, Trig, Geometry….)

2020-03-25_13-41-35I am re-sharing some lessons/videos created by Ish Zamora (@seemathrun) because they are so good and if you hadn’t seen them before, I am hoping that you explore them now. (Also, because I have run out of time to create some new ones today, due to some other responsibilities!)  I will be back tomorrow continuing my transformation theme for the week with some new mini-math lessons focused on Dilations.

For today, I am sharing a several activities created by Ish, along with accompanying videos where he talks about the activities. Some of these have been shared in previous blog posts and/or on our FB and Twitter and Youtube accounts, but here they are in one place for you to explore and choose from!

Links to some of Ish’s FREE activity papers and video support:

  1. Exponential Decay – Bouncing Ball  and Calculus Bouncing Ball (Parabolic/derivative)
  2. Proportions & Scale – Dr. Evil   and Trigonometry Mini Me 2 (Trig Intro)
  3. Taxi Cab Geometry – Circles and Distance and Uber/Taxi Cab Geometry
  4. Multiple Representations – A Gutter Problem
  5. The Soggy Grasshopper – Zeno’s Paradox

The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below: