STEM – Inertia, Force and Velocity – Newton Knew Inertia (Mini-Math Lesson)

I wanted to focus on some STEM lessons this week, using ClassPad.net, since it is so great for collecting data, showing statistical plots, and it’s ability to quickly change things to see the impact and more importantly, to do everything in the one activity (i.e. calculations, data collection, graphs, and explanations). So, I am going to share a different STEM focused lesson each day this week.

STEM is an acronym that stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. It’s really about ensuring educational experiences that blend these four areas, so that learning is not in isolation, but rather a connected learning on real-world concepts, that require students to problem-solve, collect data and analyze results, and communicate their findings and use critical thinking. There are many definitions and reasoning behind the push for STEM in education – here is one article that I think gives a good overview if you feel you need more information.

For me, STEM means learning and problems that are real-world, that students can actually do or experiment or relate to, that require them to use science, math, technology and engineering in realistic ways or situations. It’s looking for and collecting evidence, and then modeling this information, and applying understandings of the subjects to make sense or make decisions. The activities I am going to focus on this week come from Fostering STEM Education with Casio Technology, Casio 2013. It is a resource with some really great real-world problems and explorations, and these can be done by students or there is also sample data provided if you don’t have the materials needed to do the experiments yourself. So you can make these activities as hands-on as you want, but if not possible, still have the great discovery and conversations and critical-thinking experiences needed for deep learning and application of STEM concepts.

Today’s activity is one that you could very easily do with students (and it even adheres to social distancing rules!).  In the image above, you will see it involves six students – five to stand at designated and one to push the object in a straight path.  This activity explores how the amount of push impacts inertia and acceleration. There is an object that starts from static position (so a disc (like a frisbee) or ball), and then a student pushes it in a same line with as much consistent push as possible, and as it passes student at the set up positions, they time when the object passes.  The force is changed for three trials and then students compare the data in several ways. So, a fun activity, but, if you are unable to do this with all the materials, or students, then you can use the sample data provided.

Here is the link to the activity, both the ClassPad.net version and the PDF that can be used and a video overview:


The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below: