Free Online Casio How-to’s & Content Focused lessons – Great Personal Learning Resources

I am clearly on a ‘what should you do with your summer’ kick, if you look at my previous two posts. But – my belief is that summer, while a time for fun and relaxation, is also a time to brush up on some skills you may be lacking or things you want to learn, find new ideas for the classroom….basically, use the time to foster your own personal learning.

This learning doesn’t need to be expensive, it doesn’t need to be long – it’s all about improving skills or learning new ones. With that said, I thought I would remind all of you, whether you are a teacher, a student, or a parent of a student – if you want to brush up on your Casio calculator skills, we have a lot of free online tutorials and how-to’s that might fit the bill. In my interactions with teachers, I am often asked if we have ‘tutorials’ so that the teachers can support all those students coming to class with Casio calculators (because they are more affordable and much more intuitive to use).  The answer is yes!

In this post I am just going to share some links to our free online resources, and highlight a couple of the videos here as well.

Casio Education has a Youtube Channel where we post previous webinars (so these are longer and actual ‘lessons’), shorter how-to’s, and some quick reference videos and overviews as well. Here’s the link to the Casio YouTube Channel.

A couple highlights here:

Here is an example of a short look at the fx-9860 Stat menu:

Here is a much longer lesson with the Casio Prizm on families of functions:

There are also Prizm specific guided tours at this link.

And I have my personal YouTube channel where I do comparisons and how-to’s on the different calculators, so there might be something of interest there as well.

Here’s a quick how-to using the fx-991 Scientific Calculator to solve systems of equations (and use the QR code):

So – if you have a spare 10 minutes or a spare hour, there’s something for you and we will continually add to these so come back often!

Advertisements

The Last Five Minutes of Class

You teachers out there know that those last five minutes of class – when students are ‘packing up’ even if you are not quite finished with the class activities, or, you’ve finished and they are suppose to be working on their assignments or reviewing – are often  a ‘wasted’ five minutes. In my many years at schools, I saw teachers use that time in various ways – but more often than not, it was simply time to get ready to leave, basically chat time and get your stuff together and wait time. Not productive learning time at all.

It’s easy enough to make these moments into fun, engaging, mathematics problem-solving that students, believe it or not, actually come to enjoy and request. I use to have a few different things that I would pull out – focusing on either logical thinking or number-sense or puzzles. Here are just a couple of things:

  1. I had the 24-game – several different versions.  I(If you have never played this or seen this, you should explore it). So, in those last 5 minutes, I would pull out a card, write the 4 numbers on the board and students would try to reach the target of 24. As an example: 2, 3, 4, 4 and you can add, subtract, multiply or divide using each number one time, to make 24. I often had candy for anyone who could come up with a strategy.
  2. If you don’t have actual cards, you can create your own version of ‘reach the target’.  So, pick 4 random numbers using a calculator, and give students a target number to try to reach (so 24). Or, choose 2, 3, or 4 random numbers with a calculator (or have students give you numbers) and ask students to use all the operations and come up with the smallest outcome and/or the largest outcome.  This is a lot of fun – you get some interesting problems and students have to explain their answers and defend their solutions.
  3. Give the students a logic puzzle.  I actually purchased several logic books, and so would read one out to the students or draw/show the picture on the screen and they could work in pairs/small groups to try to come up with a solution. Great critical thinking and collaboration going on here – and if we couldn’t get the solution before the bell rang, we would take it up the next day with most of them working on it overnight. Here are some good resources for logic puzzles:
  4. Read a story.  Yep. Even with my high school students, I would read stories.  Math related of course. You would be amazed at how they actually enjoyed listening, and of course, once the ‘story’ was finished (which might take a couple days depending on our actual time at the end of each class) we’d discuss the ‘math’. Some of my favorite books:

Students loved the challenge of these last 5 minutes (sometimes it would be more). It was a very competitive yet non-threatening time where they could test their math skills or thinking skills, work together, and have fun with numbers and logic. That time was no longer wasted – it became a time students actually looked forward to and often requested.

As you are nearing the winter break, there is probably a bit more time to spare or a bit more time needed to keep students attention.  Use that time in an engaging way that allows for some critical thinking, collaboration and a game-like atmosphere that challenges students and keeps those last five minutes productive.

More than Calculators – Teacher Support & Resources

I received a message the other day from a reader who commented on how much he liked the Prizm, but because 2016-05-13_12-52-22Casio didn’t have any resources to support the learning of the Prizm, he was a little reluctant to try it.  My first reaction was “What?!! We have a TON of resources!!”  My second reaction was to ask myself why might he think this? I was able to answer my own question when I searched for our resources – the issue being they are a bit hidden among all of Casio’s other products, (which, just so you know, is of course in the process of changing as we create a more user-friendly web-page).

In the meantime, I want you to see the great teacher/student resources we have! Let me share with you the resources we have that supports teachers (and students), from complete subject-specific or grade-specific resource books (i.e. complete lessons), so sample lessons and activities (free), to online course for Prizm (free) to webinars (free).  There are teacher-created resources and quick-start guides.  Casio WANTS teachers and students to use their calculators and get the help and support they need to use them appropriately.

  1. Free online activities and sample questions: http://www.casioeducation.com/educators/activities
    • These include grade-level activities and specific Casio Prizm-vs-TI 84 activities
    • Scrolling down the page you will find sports activities for use with five different calculators
    • Keep scrolling to our Quick Start Guides for 6 of our calculators (including Prizm)
    • Keep scrolling to Subject-specific Teacher Resource Guides and Calculator Tips
    • Scroll further to see all our grade-level and subject-level resource books that contain complete lessons
  2. If you look at our products page, under Software & Additional Products, you will be able to scroll through all our grade-specific/subject-specific resource books: http://www.casioeducation.com/products/Calculators_%26_Dictionaries/Software_%26_Additional_Products/ED-WKBK-PRECALC
  3. Here’s a short-link to our Casio Lesson Library (with teacher created activities): http://www.casioeducation.com/lesson_library
  4. Short-link to Guided tours for the Prizm: http://www.casioeducation.com/resource/prizm/features/index.html
  5. 2016-05-13_12-56-04If you are interested in the Prizm, we have a whole webpage dedicated to Prizm activities and support, which includes lessons, videos, and also has the OS updates. http://www.casioeducation.com/prizm 
  6. We have a free online course for the Prizm (self-paced).  If you complete the course, you get the Prizm (fx-CG) emulator software for free. http://www.casioeducation.com/educators/online_training
  7. Free webinars on many math topics (statistics, geometry, algebra, calculus, etc.)(you do have to register your email to view these, but they are free): http://www.casioeducation.com/educators/webinars
  8. Links to manuals for specific calculators: http://www.casioeducation.com/support/manuals
  9. And let’s not forget the videos showing you how-to’s and comparisons! https://www.youtube.com/user/CasioPrizm/videos?view=0&sort=dd&shelf_id=2  and http://www.casioeducation.com/resource/HTML/edu_videoPage.html

As you can see, we have a ton of support for teachers and students wanting to use and learn-to-use Casio calculators to support their instruction and/or math learning. We hope those of you out there excited to start working with Casio calculators start using these supports. We are educators here at Casio and want you to love the calculators as much as we do!!

Random Numbers to Spark Student Thinking

In my last post, I mentioned attending a session presented by Jennifer N. Morris on making math meaningful. (She is presenting two times at #NCTMRegionals Nashville – Session #244 for 9-12 and Session #275 for 3-5, which is the Origami/Fraction/Random Number session – BE SURE TO CHECK HER OUT – She is AWESOME!). One of the activities in her session incorporated the fx-55plus calculator and using the random number generator to spark engagement, problem-solving, numerical thinking and communication with students. Simply by hitting the random # key, which creates infinite random fractions (many complex!) and have students (participants) determine if that random number was acceptable if it represented the part of a cookie they would receive led to amazing thinking. What is acceptable? What are target fractions? How are students making their estimates and decisions? How do you know yours is bigger or smaller than the person next to you? Participants were asked to line themselves up in order, least to greatest, using their random fraction, which sparked great discussion and comparison. They checked their lineup by converting the fraction very quickly to a decimal, so equivalency and number sense.

During the discussion about all the different concepts students could be focusing on (number sense, fractions, estimation, equivalence, conjectures, probability, etc.) from this simple random number generation, teachers in the session offered several suggestions for using the random number generator on the calculator.  Here are just a few:

  1. Use Random Integer to simulate the roll of a die for data collection (you could use two calculators to simulate two die).
  2. Assign every student a number, and then use Random Int constrained to the numbers in the class (i.e. 1-20).  Use Random Int to pick a number, and that student is the one called on
  3. In Collaborative Groups, assign each group member a number and use random number generator to determine who in group shares, or leads

Jennifer used the fx-55Plus because she loved how easy it was to generate the random numbers. Someone in the group asked about the scientific calculator and graphing calculators, and did they also have the random number generator. The answer was yes, but it was a bit more involved. So – realizing that using random numbers is useful no matter the grade you teach, I thought I would show a quick video on how to generate random numbers using the Casio calculators. The great thing about Casio is that calculators with the same face-plate layout have the same steps. I’ve listed below the calculators I am demonstrating and then some other calculators that would have similar steps to generate random numbers:

  • Fx-55Plus
  • Fx-350EsPlus, fx – 300ESPlus, FX115-ESPlus, fx-991EX
  •  fx-9860GII, fx-9750GII, fx-CG10Prizm

Go be random!!