Math Hardware versus software – Similarities & Differences with Casio

Students using technology as part of learning math is important because of the extension of learning that is possible, the visual connections, and explorations that become possible as a result of technology. The most common technology students use these days are their phones, tablets, computers, and of course, hand-held devices such as calculators. It all depends where you live, what schools you attend, what’s allowed or not allowed, and also what resources are actually available and understood by both teachers and students. From my own research, some schools/teachers have a multitude of resources, but most schools have limited options. And – even if there are many technology tools available, teachers tend to utilize the tool (s) they are most comfortable with, and that the majority of students have access to. Basically, it comes down to choosing a technology that is going to support the learning and that students and teachers can use relatively efficiently, so that time is not lost to ‘tool logistics’. Often times, again, based on my own research (dissertation), teachers choose tools that may NOT be the best choice for learning because they know how to use it over a much better, more appropriate tool, that they are unfamiliar with or uncomfortable with, so many times better technology tools go unused because of the ‘learning curve’.

What I wanted to use this post for today was to show how Casio has really recognized the ‘learning curve’ issue and tried to keep functionality consistent across handheld models and even in their software, providing intuitive steps and menu options right within the graphing menu itself that alleviate some of that ‘learning new tool functionality’ concerns that teachers and students often face when using technology. Our graphing calculators basically use the same steps, buttons, layout, even from the very basic ones (fx9750) (fx9860), to the more advanced ones (CG50), so if you know one, you know them all. And, even the new software, ClassPad.net, is built along the same lines, though obviously with more features and capabilities.  But there is no ‘searching for menus’ – relatively intuitive no matter the tool. Obviously, as you get into the newer models and then into the software, the functionality and options increase – we go from black-and-white displays to color, we go from intersection points on the graphing calculators to union/intersections on the software. But knowing how to use one tool makes transitioning easy, and if you had students with several different models of the handhelds, you could still be talking about the same steps and keystrokes.

The best way to compare and demo is to show you how to do the same thing on the different models. I’ve chosen to show graphing two inequalities, so that you can see, even on the older models, that shading and intersections occur. But also to show that as you progress into the newer and more powerful tools (i.e. memory capacity, color, larger screens, resolution, etc), allowing for more options and learning extensions.

Here are the two inequalities that are being graphed in each of these short GIF’s:

Each GIF below graphs the two inequalities and finds intersection points of the two graphs. The software extends that to allow for finding the Union and the Intersection of all points.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be sure to check out the free software that does calculating, graphing, statistics and geometry: ClassPad.net.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Financial App (Pt 3 in series) – Let’s Talk About Money

pexels-photo-164501With the holiday season upon us, and people often spending beyond their means, it seems appropriate to continue the CG50 (and all Casio Graphing calculators) app exploration with the Financial App.

One thing we do not spend enough time on in K-12 education is financial literacy. I know there are some states that are trying to address this, but it is not enough. This lack of understanding about money, savings, taxes, interest, debt, etc. is a huge contributor to our enormous debt crisis. Take our current political focus on the ‘tax reform’ bill that’s up for a vote soon – most people do not understand the ramifications of this because they don’t really understand anything about finances and how taxes work. We do not in this country teach the basics of financial literacy, which is why we have so many people drowning in debt, losing their homes, barely surviving month-to-month on what they make, and forget about having the ability to save for the future. How many students really understand about saving money? Or how taxes impact their hourly wages (i.e. $10/hour is not that great when you factor in all the taxes taken out)? Or how not paying of your credit card monthly can make that $300 dollar purchase become a $400 or $500 dollar purchase?

When I taught in Virginia, they started a Personal Finance course ‘elective’ (only for stock-photo-working-coffee-phone-work-check-budget-finances-personal-finance-e841754e-765d-426e-af94-4b6a4ce9891fthose students technically not on the college prep track – which was silly, as ALL students should take a course on Personal Finance). I was lucky enough to be the pilot teacher in my school, so I could pretty much create the course. My goal was to help students understand the importance of financial planning so they could survive and thrive in the world, no matter where their path took them. We started with learning about different career options they were thinking of, and what a typical annual salary might be (so plumber, electrician, hair dresser, doctor, lawyer, teacher, etc). They learned to fill out job applications, and write resumes, and then we ‘pretended’ they had been hired and were receiving biweekly payments (I actually gave them ‘checks’). We learned about payments, investing, taxes, rent, credit cards, insurance, amortization,balancing a check book (the class had a ‘bank’), etc. They had to determine where they would live, whether they would get a car, how much they could spend on food, entertainment, etc. based on their salary. What they quickly learned is that their wages, after taxes, were often NOT enough to do much else – no fancy apartment and having to make tough choices (i.e. gas or food, no car, no expensive smartphone, taking bus, walking, no movies every week, no fast food, etc.) When a student comes to you all excited about their $9/hr job and all the things they will buy, and then realize after their first paycheck that it’s going to take months to have enough, it’s eye opening. And scary.

pexels-photo-164527What I learned is that we do not talk to students about real-world, practical mathematics enough –  simple things like saving money, calculating tips, balancing a checkbook, interest, credit card debt, etc. This is math they need in their everyday life. This is math that has purpose. This is math that will help them make smarter decisions about their future. Maybe if we did, we wouldn’t have so many people struggling to survive or believing every unrealistic promise they hear in the news..

My message – let’s get some Financial Literacy into K-12 mathematics programs!

With that said, here is a quick video on the Financial App that is available on the Casio graphing calculators. This video uses the CG50.