STEM – Inertia, Force and Velocity – Newton Knew Inertia (Mini-Math Lesson)

I wanted to focus on some STEM lessons this week, using ClassPad.net, since it is so great for collecting data, showing statistical plots, and it’s ability to quickly change things to see the impact and more importantly, to do everything in the one activity (i.e. calculations, data collection, graphs, and explanations). So, I am going to share a different STEM focused lesson each day this week.

STEM is an acronym that stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. It’s really about ensuring educational experiences that blend these four areas, so that learning is not in isolation, but rather a connected learning on real-world concepts, that require students to problem-solve, collect data and analyze results, and communicate their findings and use critical thinking. There are many definitions and reasoning behind the push for STEM in education – here is one article that I think gives a good overview if you feel you need more information.

For me, STEM means learning and problems that are real-world, that students can actually do or experiment or relate to, that require them to use science, math, technology and engineering in realistic ways or situations. It’s looking for and collecting evidence, and then modeling this information, and applying understandings of the subjects to make sense or make decisions. The activities I am going to focus on this week come from Fostering STEM Education with Casio Technology, Casio 2013. It is a resource with some really great real-world problems and explorations, and these can be done by students or there is also sample data provided if you don’t have the materials needed to do the experiments yourself. So you can make these activities as hands-on as you want, but if not possible, still have the great discovery and conversations and critical-thinking experiences needed for deep learning and application of STEM concepts.

Today’s activity is one that you could very easily do with students (and it even adheres to social distancing rules!).  In the image above, you will see it involves six students – five to stand at designated and one to push the object in a straight path.  This activity explores how the amount of push impacts inertia and acceleration. There is an object that starts from static position (so a disc (like a frisbee) or ball), and then a student pushes it in a same line with as much consistent push as possible, and as it passes student at the set up positions, they time when the object passes.  The force is changed for three trials and then students compare the data in several ways. So, a fun activity, but, if you are unable to do this with all the materials, or students, then you can use the sample data provided.

Here is the link to the activity, both the ClassPad.net version and the PDF that can be used and a video overview:


The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below:

Mini-Math Lessons – Graphing Systems of Inequalities with ClassPad.net

Yesterday I shared how to actually graph inequalities and look at either the union or intersection of those graphs. We also explored how to limit the domain/range in order to only see the viable regions for solutions. Today I want to use those skills to actually solve systems of inequalities in two-variables. I am using two tasks from open-source curriculum created by Illustrative Math. Task 1  and Task 2 come from HS Modeling.

The first activity starts with a graph and asks students to interpret the graph and create the inequalities from the graph. This requires the ability to recognize that dotted lines represent inequalities with no equal sign, solid lines include the equal, and that the shaded regions represent the solution areas and help determine whether it’s greater-than or less-than. Obviously, students also need to be able to find slope and write equations of lines (we are only dealing with linear inequalities right now).

The second activity presents a real-world situation involving determining how many adults and children can fit on a boat safely, based on weight. It requires students to develop the inequality equations from the description, graph them, and then answer questions about the areas of the graph. They are then asked to determine whether different combinations of adults and children can feasibly rent boats safely, requiring them to understand where the solution region lies in their graphs.

Here are the links to the ClassPad.net activities and the video overview that explains and demonstrates some of each activity:

  1. Solution Sets
  2. Fishing Adventures

 


The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below:

Mini-Math Lessons – Systems of Equations

(The flowers have nothing to do with the math…just thought we could use a little beauty!!)

Today I am in a sense ‘cheating’ again, as I am using a previously made video and activity to share today. It seemed to fit in well not only with the advanced Algebra focus of the week, but also in light of the current pandemic crisis we are in and importance of our medical experts and workers who are giving so much every day. The activity shared today is an activity called “Not Enough Doctors”, and uses real-world data to explore our future supply-and-demand of doctors. What I like about this activity is that you will experience several different functionalities of ClassPad.net – i.e. data/statistics, graphing, text, equations, tables. It is a nice multiple-representation activity and allows students to see different ways to look at data and display data and answer questions about that data. A really important skill.

Here is the link to the activity and accompanying video:


The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below:

Mini-Math Lessons – Confidence Intervals, Sample Size,

Ending the week with a couple more lessons focused on statistical analysis. These are at a high-school level, as they explore t-tests, z-tests, and confidence intervals, among other things. In both activities, students will use some of the interval and test templates that are in the ClassPad.net statistical menu. The videos that accompany each activity will discuss how to access and use these templates, though within the activities themselves, the templates are already set up. Additionally, in the second activity, students will be exploring changes to sample size and confidence intervals and what impact these changes have on the width of the intervals, as well as p-values. They will collect data and make scatter plots to help in their analysis, so they will be getting a lot of experience with many of the statistical tools and visualizations available in ClassPad.net.

Here are the links to the activities and the video overviews:

  1. Statistcs – One Proportion zTest and zInterval
  2. Statistics – Exploring Confidence Intervals

The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below:

Mini-Math Lessons – Normal Cumulative Distribution

In keeping with this weeks theme, today’s activities focus more on statistics, and specifically the Normal Cumulative Distribution. The activities that I am sharing today are really one ‘tool’ – i.e. a simulation where you can adjust the mean, standard deviation, upper and lower bounds, to find given percentile values, and then one activity that uses the statistical functionality of finding the Normal Cumulative Distribution. One uses a simulation to change things dynamically, the other uses the functionality of ClassPad.net to find the percentile for you, as well as the upper and lower z-scores and is a specific real-world problem situation, where questions are asked in context to the results. The video overview shows you how to utilize both.

Here are the links to the two activities and the link to the video overview:

  1. Statistics – Normal Cumulative Distribution Tool for Explorations
  2. Statistics – Normal Cumulative Distribution Activity

The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below:

Mini-Math Lessons – Corona Explorations – Exponential & Logistics

There are a lot of statistics out there and a lot of graphs, some accurate and some not, on the CoVid19 virus. Which can be confusing and scary. Today’s mini-lesson is just one activity and video from Ish Zamora (@seemathrun) that tries to provide you with an understanding of how the data impacts predictions. Using a logistical curve, you will see how changes in the numbers impact the steepness of the curve and the predicted end date. You will collect your own data and answer questions about the impact of those data points.

Be sure to watch the accompanying video first to get a sense of how to collect the data and observe the changes in the curve.

The links are below.

  1. Corona Logistic Video Overview
  2. Corona Logistics Activity

We will be back tomorrow with some more mini-math lessons focused on simple statistical plots and what they can tell us about data from the elementary perspective.

Remember – stay inside, wash your hands, and social distance and we can beat this thing!!


The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below:

 

 

Mini-Math Lessons – Multiple Topics (Calculus, Trig, Geometry….)

2020-03-25_13-41-35I am re-sharing some lessons/videos created by Ish Zamora (@seemathrun) because they are so good and if you hadn’t seen them before, I am hoping that you explore them now. (Also, because I have run out of time to create some new ones today, due to some other responsibilities!)  I will be back tomorrow continuing my transformation theme for the week with some new mini-math lessons focused on Dilations.

For today, I am sharing a several activities created by Ish, along with accompanying videos where he talks about the activities. Some of these have been shared in previous blog posts and/or on our FB and Twitter and Youtube accounts, but here they are in one place for you to explore and choose from!

Links to some of Ish’s FREE activity papers and video support:

  1. Exponential Decay – Bouncing Ball  and Calculus Bouncing Ball (Parabolic/derivative)
  2. Proportions & Scale – Dr. Evil   and Trigonometry Mini Me 2 (Trig Intro)
  3. Taxi Cab Geometry – Circles and Distance and Uber/Taxi Cab Geometry
  4. Multiple Representations – A Gutter Problem
  5. The Soggy Grasshopper – Zeno’s Paradox

The tool being used in these mini-math lessons is the FREE web-based math software, ClassPad.net.

Remember – if you want to save and/or modify any of these activities, create a free account.  Some useful links below: