Let’s Explore with Geometry and Start the School Year Off Right! (New Features with ClassPad.net)

I admit it. I am a geometry nut.  It is my favorite subject to teach, which I have been doing for the past 30 years (wow….said that out loud!!). Geometry to me is all about logic and connections and relationships of shapes. It should be hands-on, it should be visual, and with technology, is should be dynamic – meaning you can see and discover relationships through movement and manipulation. There are many good resources out there (for those of you looking for a ‘textbook’, Discovering Geometry has always been my go to – it’s all about learning geometry through hands-on discovery and connections. It’s on it’s 5th edition, and the ebook has dynamic investigation using ClassPad.net (formerly used Geogebra), and ClassPad.net has made huge strides in advancing it’s geometry functionality, which is what this post is focused on. My goal over the next few posts is to focus on specific geometry explorations using some of ClassPad.net’s geometry functionality, but today’s post is an overview of what’s new.

ClassPad.net has all the tools you would expect a geometry software to have – i.e. points, straight-edge tools, polygon tools, display tools, expressions, equations, etc. It has some others don’t have – i.e. tools for conics for example. Below is a list of some of the added features as we continue to improve the functionality of the software (which is FREE, btw!!)

Quick List of New Functionality:

  1. Compass Tool
  2. Ability to add in images and use them as part of your geometry explorations
  3. Ability to create sliders for transformations (dilations, rotations, translations, reflections)
  4. Trace feature
  5. Multiple Grids, including isometric
  6. Ability to lock constructs
  7. Ability to create a rigid polygon (meaning it won’t change shape once constructed)
  8. Ability to add tick marks to sides and angles
  9. Ability to change the style of points – i.e. dot, square, x
  10. Ability to measure exterior angles explicitly and create angles 0-360
  11. Ability to construct a specific regular polygon (n-gon) by constructing one side and choosing n (number of sides)
  12. Ability to duplicate constructs without have to ‘reconstruct’ them.

I will be creating videos on each of these features and how to use them for future postings, but today, I wanted to show you where you can find the different new features. Be sure to visit ClassPad.net and sign up for an account (so you can save any work you do). Both the Free and Basic accounts are completely free and have everything you could need for a classroom (don’t forget there is calculations, graphing, statistics, financial tools, and text as well as geometry!). Below is a quick how-to on finding where all the new features for geometry are – stay tuned for future how-to’s on using the specific features. Meanwhile, why not try and explore things on your own? Have fun!!

 

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Classpad.net Version 1 – Just In Time for School!

Welcome back to a new ‘school year’ (for some anyway). I’ve been on a bit of a hiatus the last couple months, working hard and doing a bit of travel. But, time to get back to it and what better way to start things off but with the launching of Version 1 of Classpad.net.

I posted about Classpad.net back in May, in my post Classpad.net – My Math Love-Affair Continues, This time I want to actually delve much more into what Classpad.net is and share some activities and images to give you a sense of the power of this web-based software. We’ve been in Beta-mode, where we’ve been fixing bugs, working on functionality improvements, and other things while teachers and students have been playing around with the software. Big shout out to all of you who’ve been giving us feedback – we’ve been updating and making changes and fixing bugs in large part to your input. Today is the launch of Version 1, so no longer in ‘test-mode’. Does that mean it’s done? Absolutely not! The beautiful thing about web-based software is that we are constantly improving and updating and adding features. It’s really in its infancy, with so much more growth and functionality and improvement on the horizon, which makes it even more exciting knowing this is only the beginning.

What is Classpad.net?

Great question. At it’s heart, it’s FREE (yes…forever) web-based, dynamic, math software. We call it ‘digital-scratch-paper’ because you can pretty much do whatever you might do when you pull out a piece of paper – i.e. write some notes, do a calculation, make a graph, create a table, draw a picture, measure something. As we know, there are lots of math software and tools out there – but most have specific purposes (i.e. only do statistics, only graph, only do calculations, etc.), so we end up having to use one tool to make graphs, another tool to create geometry constructs, yet another one to do some statistical analysis. And then, if we want to create an assignment for students, we have to use yet another tool to copy-cut-paste our various tables, graphs, constructs, and directions into a usable document. Classpad.net allows you to do all of that on one ‘paper’, which can then be printed (PDF), or shared (unique URL), or saved.  You can send this to students via URL (email or post on your website), students can make their own copy and do their work and send it back to you. It’s all there on one page – and, the beauty is, you can arrange and rearrange things on that paper as you want. To the right is a snapshot of a ‘paper’ showing all the stickies – i.e. text, calculate, graph, geometry, table/statistical plot. You have unlimited scroll and vertical space, and all objects are moveable – arrange and rearrange to your hearts content. You can title the pages and change the banner color to help sort and group content areas.

What Are The Components of Classpad.net?

You can pretty much do all the mathematics you need with Classpad.net for all K-12 curriculum content areas, including Calculus and AP Stats. There are some features that as of today are behind a ‘paywall” (i.e. nominal fee for the add-on app feature), but these are features that most K-12 teachers would NOT want students to have or necessarily need (re: CAS ability, allowing for solving equations or factoring polynomials, as an example; handwriting recognition, and a few others as we add in functionality).  But, here are the general components of Classpad.net, and with each there is a quick GIF showing some aspect of each component:

TEXT – text is just that – you can pull up a text sticky to write directions (for student homework/tests) or descriptions. You can also type in mathematical expressions/equations/terms in the text. Text stickies can be moved and resized as needed, color changes, and you can set a sticky for students to respond to (or students can add their own text sticky to write in answers and reflections as they work on things.

 

 

 

 

CALCULATE – as you would expect, calculate does calculations and so much more. You can define functions and lists, and use them later in graphs and statistical tables. Due to natural display, you can get exact answers. You can use function notation and shortcuts (see the ? at top right of Classpad.net for the function list). And, as with all the stickies, you can move the calculation stickies wherever you need them to be or pull them up whenever needed – all on the same paper.

 

 

 

GRAPH – again, you can graph anything – equations, defined functions, inequalities, integrals, etc. You can create sliders to move graphs and compare functions. You can find area under the curve, click on the graph to see key points, add moveable points to a function plot, look at the table of values, or plot from a table a values, make moveable lines for lines of fit. Comparing graphs is easy too – you can put graphs together or pull them apart to look at things separately. You can have multiple graphs on your paper – either merged or separate. You can add pictures to your graphs as well.

 

 

 

GEOMETRY – Yep, you can even add geometry to your page. We are still building out the geometry component, but right now you can do what you would expect with a geometry tool – i.e. create geometric constructs and specific constraints (perpendiculars, parallels, etc.), measure (area, length, angles, etc.), transformations including dilation, with features that are also unique (so you can construct conics, you can draw free-hand and then ‘adjust’ shapes and objects to have particular constraints. There’s the ability to create a rotational slider. You can create Hide/Show buttons and functions and expressions, and of course typical things like hide objects and change size, colors, etc. I am excited about geometry because I know it’s only the beginning and there’s so much more we are going to be adding.

 

 

STATISTICS – So much to do already, and still so much more to come with statistics. But, what’s the most fantastic part is you don’t have to go get a ‘statistics’ tool for students to be able to collect data, record it in a table, and then analyze that data. This could mean measures of central tendency, or standard deviation, or making different statistical plots to represent the data. Normal distributions, many types of regressions, box-plots, dot plots, histograms…so much there already and we are adding more in the future. As you would expect, we have a spreadsheet that can do calculations or use pre-defined lists (see calculate). You can then add functions to your statistical plots – so everything is all in one place for students to explore and connect.

 

 

As you can see – there’s so much to do, all one one page and one platform (#one-stop-shopping) and it’s free! It’s designed to be usable on touch-screen devices and mobile-devices as well as laptops and PC’s. The perfect tool as you are preparing for this school year, or are just starting your school year (or maybe you are already in-deep to your school year….it’s never too late). Go explore and give it a try and make sure you are letting your student know about this tool. We are also building out our ready-to-use lessons and our video library of support, as we continue to add and improve functionality, so stay tuned. Check out our social media sites for updates and support and we would LOVE to hear from you – share what you and/or your students are creating!!

Check Us Out and Share Your Papers and Experiences:

  1. Classpad.net Youtube
  2. Twitter (@classpadnet)
  3. Facebook
  4. Our website – subscribe so you can start saving and sharing your work with others! Classpad.net

 

 

 

ClassPad.net – My Math Love-Affair Continues….

I am a lucky woman.

For my almost 30 years in education, I have loved what I do. Teaching math, helping others teach math, finding amazing tools and resources that make learning math engaging and exciting – my ‘work’ is a labor of love. My love-affair with mathematics and teaching has been influenced by many experiences and people and has led me to yet a another new adventure in my quest to help others love and appreciate the beauty of mathematics – Classpad.net,  a free, web-based software that I have been directly involved in, from conception, to development, and now, to public release and hopefully, viral usage!

Some of my Key family

It’s been a weird path of growth, with connections leading to new opportunities, and more connections, and more opportunities. As a new teacher, and also working on my masters at VCU in VA, I worked under John Van De Walle, who started me on the path of making mathematics hands-on and visual and based on problem-solving. This quest led me to look for resources and share my love of math at conferences – sparking my professional development/training itch.

DG5 Groupies!

My search for visualization and hands-on resources led me to a closet in our math department, where I found Discovering Geometry and Sketchpad. And as I used these resources to present at conferences, I got to know and LOVE Key Curriculum and become, I admit, a groupie. This led to getting to know the Key sales folks and being asked to become a Key consultant. All this PD experience led to an administrator job, where, miracle of miracle, all the Discovery books from Key were just being adopted, so I was part of this implementation, which led to meeting Key’s PD trainer, Tim Pope. As a result – lo and behold, this groupie is working for Key!

It was a dream come true! The Key family, one full of former math educators all trying to share the love of mathematics and create inquiry-based, engaging math through great problem-solving and dynamic math technology tools, was amazing. Then – the dream burst, the family split up, and the books went to Kendall Hunt (with Tim), and the technology to MHE (with me).

Heartbreak.

Casio Family

Time to open a new door: I decided to finish my doctorate and branch into the unknown world of education consulting. And that Key family? They are still there – sending connections and opportunities, which is why I now teach at Drexel, work with Casio, travel the world for The Dana Center and Department of Defense Education Activities, among many other experiences.

At this moment in time, my worlds have collided. My Casio family, which is a group of math educators trying to share the love of math and teaching and learning math through dynamic visualization, is inspirational. We’ve worked as a collaborative team, with Casio‘s incredible R&D team in Japan, to create a tool that is going to revolutionize mathematics. It’s everything math teachers want on one page, and it’s just in it’s baby-phase right now with potential for growth that is exciting.

The guys behind booth magic!

Classpad.net has a partnership with Kendall Hunt just recently announced. Those very Discovering Mathematics books I so love will be adding to their power of inquiry by providing our tool as the discovery math tool embedded in the ebooks. My new family is joining with my old family….(and Tim and I are reunited) (and we have a podcast too – 180days Podcast)(shameless plug)!

Right now? It feels like I’ve connected many parts of my life – where many of my previous ‘experiences’ and worlds have joined together. Not sure if this is the circle of life, or a Mobius strip, or maybe an example of a network with many nodes. But whatever it is, it feels right, it feels exciting and it feels limitless.

So, what is Classpad.net?

It is something that makes me proud to be a part of because it is a web-based software, freely available to teachers and students, that encompasses all the things I wished for as a teacher, and it’s all in one place instead of several different tools that don’t communicate with each other. My doctorate dissertation was on edtech, and how teachers have so many technology tools forced upon them (hardware, software, apps, tablets, PC’s, interactive whiteboards, student response systems, etc) and none of them talk to each other, and each require separate training and support. Instead of using any of these tools effectively, teachers use the ones they are comfortable with, and often not the tool that makes the most sense for helping students learn. Or worse, no tools at all.

Classpad.net solves that problem by being a tool where you never have to leave the page – you can do geometry on the same page you are doing statistics. You can add a calculation, you can make a graph – all from one place. You can dynamically show mathematics and students can explore math and make their own discoveries on a table or a laptop or a phone – with the touch of a finger. There is a complete CAS (computer algebra system) engine behind this software, so it’s capabilities and functionality are incredibly robust. We are just in the ‘beta’ stage of release, which is even more exciting because we are really seeking input and feedback from users – what’s not working for you? what do you want? And, just like a start-up tech company, our team is responding quickly and changing based on what teachers and students want and need. The possibilities are endless because we have Casio’s 60 years of worldwide technology expertise and the experiences and input of math teachers building something that can be what teachers and students really need, want, and use – all in one place.

We have a Classpad.net Youtube Channel that we are just starting to build out, but here’s a quick overview of Classpad.net

It’s only the beginning – so check it out. But, as someone who has had a long-standing love affair with math and math technology, this is going to be a fun ride with so much more to come!! Join the fun and start creating with math and sharing your love of math as well on Twitter and Facebook!

Geometry and the Holidays

The holidays are upon us, so of course it makes complete sense to look for geometrical connections. Or maybe that’s just me?

As a geometry teacher (just finishing up a Geometry & Spatial Reasoning course), I am seeing geometry connections everywhere. From the wrapped presents, to the origami ornaments, to the snowflake patterns, I am constantly looking for those real-world connections and easy (and cheap), ways to get students working hands-on with math.

We are all familiar with ‘holiday math’ problems that connect to wrapping presents – i.e. how much wrapping paper do you need, how much ribbon, etc. Area, surface area, linear length connections all very obvious. But, as a geometry teacher, I am also curious about the gift boxes themselves. I know it is often difficult to find 3D models for learning, so boxes provide a cheap way to provide students hands-on explorations of nets, area, surface area, volume. So – teachers – get your students to bring in boxes after the holidays – so much you can do with these!!

Another thought – origami. This time of year, teachers often create holiday decorations with their students with paper-folding, which is fun, obviously, but can also be a great way to apply many math concepts. Shapes, fractions, and transformations for example. Take the following two origami designs – a star and a tree. As you are folding, you could be having students think about the individual shapes, but also the dimensions, the fractional parts after making a fold, what types of transformation have occurred – even congruence and corresponding parts.

money-origami-star-finishedIstep-step-instructions-how-to-make-origami-star-toy-cartoon-cute-paper-steps-84628139

For example, in the star above, after folds #1, what fraction of the square does each smaller square represent? When we fold that triangle in #2, what type of triangle is it? What fraction of the original square is represented in that yellow triangle?  What type of transformation does each fold represent? Are the triangles in #3 and #4 congruent? How do you know?

images (1)step-step-instructions-how-to-make-origami-christmas-tree-illustration-67138886

Again, looking at the tree folding above, what shapes do you see in #1? What fraction of the whole paper is each shape (so squares and triangles)? How about in #2? And which shapes are congruent? How do you know? Lots of great math, that you could really explore with students while they are also doing a fun hands-on activity.

Hopefully you can use some of these ideas with your students. Have a wonderful holiday season!!

Using Pictures on the Casio Prizm CG-50 Graphing Calculator

I previously wrote a post a while back about the power of using pictures to connect mathematics to the real world. In that prior post I talk about the built-in pictures that already come with the Casio Prizm Calculator (CG-50 and CG-10), and wrote down the steps. With our new model out, the CG-50, I thought I should probably revisit this but make a quick how-to video instead just to demonstrate how easy it is and show off how many pictures are there.

Currently in my online course I am teaching, we are exploring transformations, and creating some real-world dynamic math examples, so Ferris Wheels have come up. Which got me remembering the Ferris Wheel picture that is one of the many available. Keep snowballing my thoughts, and you end up with me thinking of all the possible applications you could do with the calculator just using that one picture – i.e. what is the angle of rotation for one of the cars to ‘move’ onto another? Why are there concentric ‘circles’ as part of the structure of the ferris wheel – is this a strength issue? What is the length of one radius of the Ferris wheel (in real life – how could you calculate this from the picture? Is similarity involved?) Whats the distance between each car (measuring from the point they are attached on the Ferris wheel – so, arc length?)  And this is just one picture!

There are also ‘movies’ within the Picture Plot menu that allow you to see moving objects and plot their path as well, so again, some real-life connections to mathematical concepts right at your fingertips. As the school year is drawing to an end, this is definitely a time when you want to assess if students can make those connections of mathematics to the world around them, so exploring these types of pictures is a great way to engage students and provide them a reason for why they were learning all those math concepts. (Hopefully you were doing that all along as part of the learning process, but never too late….)

Here’s a quick video on how to access the pictures and ‘videos’ on the CG-50 Prizm, though the process is the same for the CG10 Prizm as well. Have fun exploring!

Using Connections to Build Understanding

I am teaching a Geometry & Spatial Reasoning course for Drexel this semester for their math masters program for teachers. Absolutely love it because I am learning so much from my students/peers, but because it really is bringing home the importance of prior knowledge to help build connections and real-world connections in helping students learn versus memorize, and construct and reconstruct based on their ability to make connections.

My students, who are a mix of very new math teachers, experienced teachers, and even some career-switchers still in the early stages of teaching, are having this great discussions on the importance of using prior knowledge to help student make their own connections. Some have been doing this all along, but others, as they themselves struggle with some of the geometric concepts we are ‘learning’ (relearning in some cases), are coming to understand the value in helping students use what they know to build on and connect to new information. Makes it easier to recall, and builds a confidence in students that when faced with an unknown situation/problem, they have the skills and confidence to look at it, break it down or add in things to make the unknown familiar and then look for and make use of structure (see what I did there….Common Core Math Practice #7!) to help reach a solution or develop a new conjecture/conclusion.

As an example, we’ve been doing a lot of work with inscribed angles in circles and how do you help students use prior knowledge to build the idea that an inscribed angle is half the measure of it’s intercepted arc if you don’t want students just memorizing formulas? Basically, the conversations revolve around constantly using prior knowledge to make connections, which might mean you need to add in an auxiliary line to a given shape to ‘see’ something familiar (i.e. a linear pair or a triangle, as examples). A strategy that really helps students look for and make use of the structures they are familiar with to help them make sense of a problem.  Here’s an example of just one way to explore inscribed angles, using previously knowledge about triangles:

inscribed-angle

  • In Fig 1, we have an inscribed angle and its intercepted arc a. How could you show that angle 1 (the inscribed angle) is half the measure of it’s intercepted arc? Here’s where students need to make sense of this structure – what prior knowledge can they use to help them?
  • In Fig 2, they add in a radius (auxiliary line), because they know all radii in this circle (any circle are equal – doesn’t change the original inscribed angle….but now – we have a triangle and a central angle (angle 2).  What do they already know? Well, they know the central angle 2 is the same as the measure of the intercepted arc, which is the same intercepted arc as angle 1 (inscribed angle).
  • In Fig 3, students are looking at the triangle created and using prior knowledge – we can mark the two radii equal, making this triangle an isosceles triangle, which they already know from prior knowledge has two base angles that measure the same (angle 1 & 3). Angle 2 is an exterior angle to the triangle, and angles 1 & 3 are remote interior, which they know from prior knowledge sum to the measure of angle 2. Since angle 1 & 2 are equal (isosceles triangle), that makes them each half of angle 2 (Sum divided by 2). Angle 2 is equal in measure to the intercepted arc, so angles 1 & 2 are each half of that, so the inscribed angle 1 is half the intercepted arc.
  • Fig 4 shows that the relationship holds true even if you change the size of the inscribed angle.

This is of course just one example for an inscribed angle, but they can then use this to show that inscribed angles that are not going through the center of the circle have the same relationships – ie add in auxiliary lines, use linear pairs, or triangles or other known things to help make sense and show new things. Prior knowledge, connections – they really matter.

As teachers, it is our duty to make sure we are modeling and helping students use what they know to build these connections and see the relationships. It takes deliberateness on our part, it requires modeling, it requires setting expectations for students till it becomes a habit (habits of mind) to look for and make sense by pulling in previous knowledge.

Another thing we need to do is make connections to real-world. My students are sometimes struggling with this idea of relating prior knowledge and new ideas to real-world applications, but if you get in the habit, its not so hard to do. Since I am focused on circles and the lines that intersect them now with my class, I pulled up a ready-to-use lesson from Casio’s lesson library that is a great example of a real-world connection to circle concepts that would force the use of previous knowledge.  The lesson is briefly described below:

The Perfect Glass Dome: (here’s a link to the complete, downloadable activity)

  • – Use coordinate geometry to represent and examine the properties of geometric shapes.
  • – Recognize and apply geometric ideas and relationships in areas outside the mathematics classroom, such as art, science, and everyday life.

This activity uses the Prizm Graphing calculator and picture capability to help build understanding.

dispcap1 The kinds of questions and connections to prior knowledge that can be asked of students just by looking at the image are pretty endless. What relationships do you see (i.e. lots of diameters, or straight angles, lots of central angles, all the angles are 360, are their auxiliary lines we could add to find the areas or relationships or angle measures, etc.).

If you look around, you can probably find a real-world example of most math concepts your are working on with your students. Show them pictures, show them real objects they can get their hands on. Start asking questions. Ask them what they recognize or think they already know. Ask them if they could add something or take away something to see a familiar object/concept. How does that help them? What relationships and connections help them get to something new or interesting?

My Drexel course and student are reemphasizing for me (and them) the importance of prior knowledge to help build connections on a continuous basis, all the time, every day. It helps students think mathematically and consistently use vocabulary and math concepts to deepen and create new understanding and relationships. It also promotes logical reasoning and problem solving – win-win!