Free Online Casio How-to’s & Content Focused lessons – Great Personal Learning Resources

I am clearly on a ‘what should you do with your summer’ kick, if you look at my previous two posts. But – my belief is that summer, while a time for fun and relaxation, is also a time to brush up on some skills you may be lacking or things you want to learn, find new ideas for the classroom….basically, use the time to foster your own personal learning.

This learning doesn’t need to be expensive, it doesn’t need to be long – it’s all about improving skills or learning new ones. With that said, I thought I would remind all of you, whether you are a teacher, a student, or a parent of a student – if you want to brush up on your Casio calculator skills, we have a lot of free online tutorials and how-to’s that might fit the bill. In my interactions with teachers, I am often asked if we have ‘tutorials’ so that the teachers can support all those students coming to class with Casio calculators (because they are more affordable and much more intuitive to use).  The answer is yes!

In this post I am just going to share some links to our free online resources, and highlight a couple of the videos here as well.

Casio Education has a Youtube Channel where we post previous webinars (so these are longer and actual ‘lessons’), shorter how-to’s, and some quick reference videos and overviews as well. Here’s the link to the Casio YouTube Channel.

A couple highlights here:

Here is an example of a short look at the fx-9860 Stat menu:

Here is a much longer lesson with the Casio Prizm on families of functions:

There are also Prizm specific guided tours at this link.

And I have my personal YouTube channel where I do comparisons and how-to’s on the different calculators, so there might be something of interest there as well.

Here’s a quick how-to using the fx-991 Scientific Calculator to solve systems of equations (and use the QR code):

So – if you have a spare 10 minutes or a spare hour, there’s something for you and we will continually add to these so come back often!

Math Fun in San Antonio – NCTM 2017 Annual

Next week is the NCTM Annual Math Conference in San Antonio, TX.  It’s a great time to go to Texas, as the weather hasn’t gotten too hot. I remember the last time NCTM was in San Antonio, when I was still teaching high school, and met up with all my teacher friends. We had such a great time, not only going to different workshops at the conference, but exploring the area (a trip to the Alamo was a must) and eating and shopping along the River Walk. I am going this year as part of the education team for Casio, where there will be a lot of fun to be had at our exhibit booth and sponsored events.  I have been going to NCTM Annuals for over 23 years (what?????), and as usual, I am looking forward to reconnecting with math educators and friends from all over the country, many of whom I only get to see this one time a year. So, it’s more than just a place to learn new ideas and collaborate with like-minded educators, it’s a time to renew friendships and share memories. I certainly am hoping to catch up with as many folks as I can, even if just to share a cup of coffee or a hug as we pass in the conference hall.

Naturally, the goal of attending a conference is to learn new things to bring back to your classroom or to the educators you work with. It’s one of the aspects of these conferences I love the most – the ‘renewed’ energy and excitement that occurs when you see a strategy that you want to take back to your class or you learn a new approach to a familiar concept that you know will resonate with your students, or you find that perfect resource for an upcoming unit. I always consider these conferences as a way to reaffirm why we teach math – seeing what others are doing, sharing stories and ideas, and leaving with at least one or two ideas that are going to spark your students creativity and understanding. For me personally, I always had a key focus (say Algebra, or Geometry or technology or manipulatives) to narrow down the workshops I went to, with the goal to find a few new resources, ideas and strategies to incorporate into my teaching over the summer so that next years classes would be even better. This type of focus helped to make ‘teaching’  a new adventure every year, even if I was teaching the same subjects, and it also made sure that as a teacher, I was always challenging myself to be better and find relevant strategies and multiple ways to help my students learn.

One aspect that I always look for is technology applications and resources. I am a firm believer in the idea that technology, whether it be a calculator, a tablet, a computer, a video, can be a valuable resource to help students both learn and develop mathematical understanding, but more importantly to visualize abstract concepts and explore ‘what if’s’.  I am sure there are many of you out there as well looking for some technology workshops as you attend NCTM this year, so I wanted to share some workshops from some of the amazing teachers that work with Casio, as these are always such great hands-on experiences.

Workshops:

  • Thursday, April 6 – 9:30 – 10:30, Room 213AB Conv Center: Exhibitor’s Workshop What’s New At Casio: Viewing Mathematics through a New Prizm (or Two) 
  • Thursday, April 6, 3:15 – 4:30, Room 217C Conv. Center: Polar, Parametric, Rectangular Graphs – Really See the Connections! with DeeDee Henderson
  • Friday, April 7, 11 – 12:00, Room Presido ABC (Grand Hyatt): Conceptualizing Polynomials with Jennifer N. Morris
  • Friday, April 7, 1:30 – 2:45, Room 224 Conv. Center: Conics – The Ugly Duckling of Algebra 2 with Denise Young & Tracey Zak Johnson.
  • Friday, April 7, 2:o0 – 3:00, Room 008AB Conv. Center: The Probabilities and Mathematics of “Wheel of Fortune” with Mike Reiners
  • Saturday, April 8, 8:00 – 9:15, Room 006D Conv. Center: Hands-on Activities + Technology = Mathematical Understanding through Authentic Modeling with Tom Beatini

We will also be having a fun time at the booth, Thursday – Saturday, playing games, having give-aways, talking and doing mathematics with our hand-held technology, so be sure to stop by and say hi (Booth #631) and come play with math. I will be there most of the time and hope to meet some new math educators and give a hug to old friends!!

Online Training for Casio Prizm – Get Free Emulator Software!

One of the most frequently asked questions I remember at the NCTM Regionals and NCTM Annual Conventions from teachers was “do you have any training to help me learn to use the the Casio calculators because I have so many students in my math classroom using them and I want to be able to support them?”  The short answer is yes, we do!

2016-09-06_15-57-07There are a couple of free options available on-demand now.  One is the Quick-Start guide that will help both teachers and students navigate and learn some of the basic functionality. We have quick-start guides for several of our calculators which you can find at this link: Quick-Start Calculator Guides. The other option, specific to the Prizm, is a free, self-paced, online course for teachers that let’s you learn about the calculator and specific features by working through modules. The great thing about this course, besides the fact that it’s free, is when you complete it you get the emulator software free for use on your computer for use with your classroom instruction. Can’t beat that deal!  There are of course several other free resources, but these two are a terrific way to get started.

Additionally, we will be offering some upcoming, regionally based workshops where you spend a few hours doing content-specific math activities while familiarizing yourself with the calculator. You leave with a free calculator and read-to-use lessons. All for only $35, so that’s a pretty amazing deal as well, plus you get some professional development hours and collaboration with other mathematics educators.  Stay tuned for those.

Just like with students, starting the new year for teachers means learning new things and finding supports for your own learning and teaching. Take advantage of both free and inexpensive ways to develop new skills and get some great hardware & software to enhance your classroom instruction. Don’t forget we have a Youtube channel of free videos as well.

Test-Driving Classroom Technology

45785364I am a huge proponent of using technology in the classroom, particularly in mathematics. If technology is used appropriately, it can do several things: provide visuals for concepts that are often hard for students to grasp; allow for students to explore and test conjectures; provide opportunities to go beyond basic understandings and get into deeper meaning and more complex structures; provide multiple ways to practice and learn; and obviously, foster engagement. These are just some of the benefits.  There is of course a downside to technology – lack of training for teachers often leads to using technology just as a digital replacement of paper and pencil – an electronic worksheet for example – in which case, what’s the point?  That’s NOT a great use. Or using technology when it is NOT the best option or doesn’t really enhance/support the learning goals. Or using the wrong technology. Just because you have technology doesn’t mean it’s a good fit for your learning goals/standards.

In my own research, and in my personal travels around the country working in math classrooms and with math teachers, there is a wide variety of technology available, and more often than not, this technology is NOT being used to enhance and expand learning. Often times this is because technology has been purchased with no real effort to match it to learning goals or standards, and little or no training or support for how to use the technology in the classroom has been provided. Teachers are frustrated, students are frustrated, and the technology becomes just another ‘add on’ versus a true learning tool.

blackboard-573023__180

What is often missing in a technology implementation is the most crucial step – planning. With planning, technology aligned to objectives becomes a focus for purchasing technology that actual supports learning goals and needs. Seems obvious – but, having been an administrator, I know that often times ‘funds’ for technology are released and must be spent quickly (i.e. for me, I was told we must put our orders in by this week or we lose the funding), so often times technology is purchased that sounds good, or looks good, but may in fact not be a good fit.

Ideally, technology should support learning goals, which can only happen if you sit down with your subject leaders/teachers, look at your standards and learning goals, and then analyze the various technology options and determine which ones support those goals. And, if possible, test these technologies out BEFORE purchasing, to ensure they do indeed support learning.  This also allows you to plan for training needs of the teachers, infrastructure, curriculum and standards alignment, etc. These are important steps – often left out of the technology implementation process – and often the reason why much of the technology in school is misused and unused.  I bet if you looked around your school you would find a lot of ‘great technology’ gathering dust.

2016-08-18_17-44-25

If technology company’s were smart, and if IT and Education leaders really focused on planning for technology, there would be a lot more pilots or test-driving of technology before big purchases are made. (LAUSD and the iPad debacle comes to mind). The ability to try out technology with both teachers and students and really see if it is going to be a good fit to meet your learning goals is something that will  help your school/district make the best technology decisions and purchases. As an example, CASIO Education has a technology loaner program where you can in fact, test-drive our technology before you purchase. It makes sense – if you are thinking of purchasing some graphing calculators, why not test-drive the 9750 GII and the Prizm and see which one fits your algebra or geometry or calculus students and standards the best? Is the FX-55plus a good fit for your elementary and middle school students? These types of questions are what should arise when you plan for technology AHEAD of time and having the ability to test-drive your options before spending the money just makes sense.

You don’t buy a new car without a test drive, so why buy technology without one? Especially when making large school/district purchases.

Here’s the link to CASIO’s loaner program – check it out and go for a drive! http://www.casioeducation.com/benefits/loaner

Calculators – Back to School Choices

gallery-1466087182-middle-school-and-high-school-school-suppliesHard to believe that summer is already over – for some students anyway.  Depends of course where you live – here in PA students don’t go back until the end of August, in VA, it’s after Labor Day, and in CA, my sisters kids are already on their 4th day of the new school year.

As a teacher and as a parent, I know the beginning of the school year involves a lot of money and making choices – new clothes, bookbags, pens, pencils, papers, notebooks, calculators.  Those long “school supply lists” seemed to get longer every year.  In part because school funding has decreased, so teachers have less to work with and count on the parents to help support classroom needs. Though, as most of you know, teachers spend a lot of their own personal money on their classrooms and students too.  Something to remember when you question the box of tissues, the dry-erase markers, and other seemingly ‘unnecessary for my child’ supplies.

These days, some of the needed supplies come with a hefty price-tag – laptops and tablets for example. Depends again on what the school/school district supplies and if your child’s school even uses such technology.  BYOD (bring your own device) schools expect you to provide these, and those that do provide the devices often require a hefty ‘rental’ fee – for obvious reasons such as damage, repairs, upkeep, etc.  But – these more expensive items are still not the norm in most schools – again, because of funding, lack of internet, lack of training on how to use these devices appropriately, etc. In my research, only about 25% of schools are using laptops/tablets on a daily basis, with most students only getting access to these a few times a month (shared laptop/tablet carts or a computer lab).

One technology tool that is still prevalent and requested, more so in middle and high school, is the calculator. Schools use to supply these, and some still do, but the cost to maintain and replace broken or lost calculators is difficult when school funding is so drastically reduced. Calculators are often added to the school supply list, like in my sisters case, where she was asked to buy two graphing calculators for her two high school students. Sometimes they request a specific brand – for no other reason than its what the teacher/school is familiar with, not considering price at all. But price matters, especially when functionality is the same and often times better. Scientific calculators have similar price tags, no matter the brand, but graphing calculators have a huge range of pricing and options – color, non-color…what to choose? Color graphing calculators in particular can be expensive – $150 for the ‘familiar’ model. But you don’t always need to get the most expensive, ‘familiar’, requested model just because it’s on the list.  Get the one that’s going to support your child’s math learning.

IMG_3406Obviously I am going to promote Casio calculators here, since I am a IMG_3407Brand Ambassador for them.  But, as a math teacher for 25 years, I am also promoting them because they are truly a better calculator and more affordable, so why wouldn’t you make that choice? If your child needs to purchase a calculator, then just go into a store, like Walmart or Target or online – and compare. In the Scientific models, pricing is similar, so how do you choose? Well- you go with functionality and Casio is easier to use and, as in the case of the fx-300Es vs the TI-30xIIs, the Casio makes fractions look like actual fractions, lets you see tables when entering data – just a few of the things it does better. Same in elementary calculators – the fx-55plus is far superior than any TI calculator and fractions look like fractions! (i.e Natural display).

Graphing calculators are trickier – there are color options, non-color options. In all cases, Casio is much more affordable than TI. Do you need a color graphing calculator is probably the real question. For more advanced mathematics courses, the color graphing calculator is the better choice for several reasons, for example they tend to have more functionality and color displays allow for easy comparison when looking at several functions on one graph. The Casio Prizm is significantly more affordable than either of TI’s color options, and as we showed at NCTM, a previous blog, and in many comparison videos, the Prizm outperforms TI.

2015-10-29_14-24-37In most instances, particularly middle school, color is not needed, in which case you can get a Casio Graphing calculator like the 9750GII or the 9860GII for 1/3 to 1/2 the price of a T. Even without color, both of these calculators outperform and are easier to use than the TI models, including color (see videos again!) And, if you only want to purchase one graphing calculator for your child to last all through high school, both of these will get them through the highest levels of math. I guess my thoughts are why pay more for a name when you can get a better calculator at a significantly more affordable price? And if the teachers or schools say it must be a specific model, that’s only because it’s what they know – it’s NOT because it’s a better product. And in this day and age, where we are all watching our money and have to make choices, I say go with the more affordable and efficient functioning option.

As you go shopping for your back to school supplies, just remember you have choices. So choose what works best for your budget, your child, and don’t forget to pick up some extra tissues and dry-erase markers for the classroom – they are definitely needed!!

More than Calculators – Teacher Support & Resources

I received a message the other day from a reader who commented on how much he liked the Prizm, but because 2016-05-13_12-52-22Casio didn’t have any resources to support the learning of the Prizm, he was a little reluctant to try it.  My first reaction was “What?!! We have a TON of resources!!”  My second reaction was to ask myself why might he think this? I was able to answer my own question when I searched for our resources – the issue being they are a bit hidden among all of Casio’s other products, (which, just so you know, is of course in the process of changing as we create a more user-friendly web-page).

In the meantime, I want you to see the great teacher/student resources we have! Let me share with you the resources we have that supports teachers (and students), from complete subject-specific or grade-specific resource books (i.e. complete lessons), so sample lessons and activities (free), to online course for Prizm (free) to webinars (free).  There are teacher-created resources and quick-start guides.  Casio WANTS teachers and students to use their calculators and get the help and support they need to use them appropriately.

  1. Free online activities and sample questions: http://www.casioeducation.com/educators/activities
    • These include grade-level activities and specific Casio Prizm-vs-TI 84 activities
    • Scrolling down the page you will find sports activities for use with five different calculators
    • Keep scrolling to our Quick Start Guides for 6 of our calculators (including Prizm)
    • Keep scrolling to Subject-specific Teacher Resource Guides and Calculator Tips
    • Scroll further to see all our grade-level and subject-level resource books that contain complete lessons
  2. If you look at our products page, under Software & Additional Products, you will be able to scroll through all our grade-specific/subject-specific resource books: http://www.casioeducation.com/products/Calculators_%26_Dictionaries/Software_%26_Additional_Products/ED-WKBK-PRECALC
  3. Here’s a short-link to our Casio Lesson Library (with teacher created activities): http://www.casioeducation.com/lesson_library
  4. Short-link to Guided tours for the Prizm: http://www.casioeducation.com/resource/prizm/features/index.html
  5. 2016-05-13_12-56-04If you are interested in the Prizm, we have a whole webpage dedicated to Prizm activities and support, which includes lessons, videos, and also has the OS updates. http://www.casioeducation.com/prizm 
  6. We have a free online course for the Prizm (self-paced).  If you complete the course, you get the Prizm (fx-CG) emulator software for free. http://www.casioeducation.com/educators/online_training
  7. Free webinars on many math topics (statistics, geometry, algebra, calculus, etc.)(you do have to register your email to view these, but they are free): http://www.casioeducation.com/educators/webinars
  8. Links to manuals for specific calculators: http://www.casioeducation.com/support/manuals
  9. And let’s not forget the videos showing you how-to’s and comparisons! https://www.youtube.com/user/CasioPrizm/videos?view=0&sort=dd&shelf_id=2  and http://www.casioeducation.com/resource/HTML/edu_videoPage.html

As you can see, we have a ton of support for teachers and students wanting to use and learn-to-use Casio calculators to support their instruction and/or math learning. We hope those of you out there excited to start working with Casio calculators start using these supports. We are educators here at Casio and want you to love the calculators as much as we do!!

Proud to be a Sponsor – ASSM, NCSM, BBA

CIMG3737I and the Casio Education team just got back from San Francisco where we were part of the Association of State Supervisors of Math (ASSM), National Council of Supervisors of Math (NCSM) and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics conferences. Each conference and experience was different, and gave us a broad perspective on what is happening in math education around the country and the hard work education leaders and teachers are doing to support the teaching and learning of mathematics. I am going to do a IMG_2635NCTM specific post later this week, and would like to devote this post to the three events where Casio had the privilege to support ASSM, NCSM and the Benjamin Banneker Association (BBA). Each event/sponsorship provided a unique opportunity to learn about the mathematics community and all these educators do to ensure students are getting a quality mathematics education.

CIMG3731We started our time in San Francisco hosting the opening reception for ASSM. After the Keynote speaker, Gail Burrill, I was honored to be able to say a few words regarding the state of technology in mathematics classrooms. This was my first time meeting and getting to know some of the current and former state supervisors of mathematics from all over the United States. It was clear, from their great questions during the Keynote and engaging conversation and sharing of information at the reception, that they are focused on ensuring their schools districts, educational leaders and teachers are getting the support they need. One thing I learned was how incredibly busy these ASSM members are, and, in fact, many of these were retired supervisors still working with their states and teachers – now that’s dedication! While I am still finding out more about ASSM, I know that they are a CIMG3743group of math leaders dedicated to ensuring that mathematics education is getting needed funding, math teachers are getting the support and training, and schools are getting a clear understanding of both state and federal expectations for students to learn math effectively.  It’s a big job, a very political job, but clearly a very dedicated and focused group of educators willing to do the job.

IMG_2633Our next adventure was in Oakland, CA for the NCSM conference. I have to say it was pretty cool walking around and seeing all the volunteers wearing Casio t-shirts and everyone carrying a Casio bag, both part of Casio’s sponsorship.  (If you were there and got a bag, don’t you just love the water bottle holder!!!??!) This was the first year NCSM was not in the same location as NCTM (which was across the bay in San Francisco), which was a little concerning, knowing there might be fewer attendees as a IMG_1987result. However, there quite a few participants at the conference, and I know as I popped into several sessions, the rooms were full with math educators ready to learn. As part of our sponsorship, we hosted a Sponsorship Showcase the first morning, presented by one of our fabulous mathematics teachers, Mike Reiners. It was a fascinating workshop, based on the game show, Wheel of Fortune, which Mike was an actual contestant on. It was fascinating to learn and calculate the probabilities of landing on certain values and the probability of things like losing your turn or hitting the million dollar wedge. I, like many others in the room, thought that the probabilities remained constant, since each spin of the wheel is independent from the others, but apparently, not the case!  It was also great to actual see real video footage of Mike’s actual appearance on IMG_1989the show and make predictions about what he (and the other contestants) should have done, and then see the real results.  It was also hilarious to see the teachers in our workshop trying to guess the word/phrase themselves – there were some pretty quick responses! Mike used both the fx-991 Scientific Calculator, with it’s natural display and spreadsheet capabilities as well as the Prizm graphing calculator, to show the statistics and probabilities. All the participants had hands-on with the calculators as well, so they could do some of the calculations themselves. That’s always fun to see everyone’s reaction to these calculators and how excited they get about their functionality (yes – we are math teachers!). All the attendees walked away with a free Prizm, which was exciting….some new Casio users!!

After a busy few days in Oakland, we ended back in San Francisco, ending our week with the NCTM conference at the San Francisco Conference Center. This wasCIMG3868 so much fun with so many math educators over the course of three days.  In fact, it was such a great time I am going to devote an entire post to just NCTM later this week.  What I would like to focus on from NCTM here is the Benjamin Banneker Reception Casio had the privilege of sponsoring on Thursday evening. It was BBA’s 30th year celebration and we were so excited to be able CIMG3880to be a part of this great group of leaders who dedicate so much time, resources, and support to ensure equitable educational opportunities for African American students. At the reception there were several outstanding local area educators honored for their outstanding efforts on behalf of their students. Hearing their stories, where they work diligently, tirelessly, and at all hours of the day giving of themselves to ensure their students succeed in school and have support was inspirational. There were also three students honored, two of whom relieved a $250 Book Award from BBA to support them as they went on to college, and one student received a $1,000 scholarship from Casio towards their college endeavors. It brought tears to my eyes as I listened to these three students talk about their struggles and perseverance, encouraged to “make a plan and see it through” along with the the support they received from their principal and their parents. To top it off, there was a great musical group that had everyone clapping along. It was a lovely to meet, support and get a sense of the powerful work the BBA is doing to support equitable education opportunities and resources for students. Casio is certainly excited to be a part of their work in the continuing years.CIMG3861

All in all, sponsoring such great organizations is something Casio is excited we have the opportunity to do. ASSM, NCSM, and BBA are dedicated groups of educators who are striving to improve mathematics education and education in general. Being able to meet and support these groups was a rewarding experience in itself and for me personally, inspired me and made me more aware of the hard work these groups of educators are out there doing every day to make a difference in students’ lives. Hopefully this gave you a small glimpse.  Next post I will talk about the fun we had at NCTM – lots of pictures to come!